Posts Tagged Jude Law


Photo Credit: Fox Searchlight, 2014

Photo Credit: Fox Searchlight, 2014

Clocking in at a brisk runtime of 93 minutes, DOM HEMINGWAY is a curious film that somehow manages to be both too ambitious and too short at the same time. Director Richard Shepard certainly knows the type of stories he wants to tell about the titular Dom Hemingway, a London safe-cracker looking for his place in the world after serving a 12 year stint in prison. Through the film, Hemingway struggles with readjusting to a world that has left him in the dust over the past decade of isolation, tries to collect on an old debt, longs for a relationship with his daughter and grandchild, and tries to reintegrate himself into the criminal underground. 

Each of these story elements holds the potential for solid story telling, but the break-neck pace of the film rushes Dom from situation to situation without every allowing a scene to breath. A longer run time  or a more judicious editing hand with the script may have solved this fatal problem, allowing either more time for plot points to play out, or elimination extraneous sequences. Instead, we’re left with the film that fails to cram four fully realized acts into a three act structure. Read the rest of this entry »


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Checking In To The Grand Budapest Hotel

The Grand Budapest Hotel

A Wes Anderson film is always going to look like a Wes Anderson film, creating a consistency that die hard fans have come to love, and critics might find exhausting. Anderson’s latest offering, The Grand Budapest Hotel, relies on many of the familiar Anderson-isms that we have come to expect of the director: vivid colors, outlandish characters, plot twists that remain whimsical even when exploring dark territory, and sets that look lovingly and painstakingly hand designed. I could probably get away with ending my review there; if you like Wes Anderson’s aesthetic, you’ll enjoy The Grand Budapest Hotel, and if you find it tedious, you should probably skip it.

Boom. Review done, under 200 words.

The Grand Budapest Hotel

Okay, for those of you still reading, you might be looking for something a bit more substantive, and I am quite happy to oblige. The Grand Budapest Hotel is a story inside of a story inside of a story, creating a narrative that presents itself as a cinematic Russian nesting doll. Our framing story is that of an author recounting his most notable interview; that interview, in turn, is of a successful citizen of the fictional country of Zubrowka who tells the story of his time as the lobby boy of the Grand Budapest Hotel in the 1930s. Fortunately, Anderson doesn’t spend too much time on either framing story, spending most of his time with the lobby boy and his mentor, M. Gustave, avoiding what could have made for a confusing set of timelines. Read the rest of this entry »

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